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Winners of ESA's student competition - Treasure students prove their dual-frequency smartphone app

Winners of ESA's student competition - Treasure students prove their dual-frequency smartphone app

Winners of ESA student competition for GSA Galileo smartphone app competition 2019 .::. GNSS Android-based Dual Frequency Iono-estimating Precise Point Positioning Winners of ESA student competition for GSA Galileo smartphone app competition 2019 .::. GNSS Android-based Dual Frequency Iono-estimating Precise Point Positioning Winners of ESA student competition for GSA Galileo smartphone app competition 2019 .::. GNSS Android-based Dual Frequency Iono-estimating Precise Point Positioning
© ESA
Winners of ESA student competition for GSA Galileo smartphone app competition 2019 .::. GNSS Android-based Dual Frequency Iono-estimating Precise Point Positioning

Winner of ESA's student competition :: students and young researchers successfully competed to design a smartphone app which takes advantage of Galileo’s dual-frequency signal. The winning entries came from the multinational ‘O ThiSaVRoS’ team (Treasure) and should soon be available to the public. The students are cooperating in an Innovative Training Network (ITN) and our institute's external PhD student Francesco Darugna is among the winners.

The multinational ‘O ThiSaVRoS’ team – named after the Greek word for treasure – developed the ‘GNSS Android-based Dual Frequency Iono-estimating Precise Point Positioning’ or GADIP3 app.

The app allows users to perform reliable positioning fixes in real time – selecting which constellations to employ and a choice of single or dual frequency signals – while advanced users can modify the way the positioning is performed, and log all available data for follow-up analysis.

The five-person team hail from China, Greece, Italy and Spain, studying at Portugal's Instituto Superior Técnico Lisboa, Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, Germany’s Leibniz Universität Hannover and the Universities of Bath and Nottingham in the UK. They worked remotely to develop and test the app over the previous six months.

As their app’s name suggests, O ThiSaVRoS hope to achieve precise point positioning in future, made possible by dual-frequency signal availability, to come close to single-metre-scale precision.

More information about the research team and the full article on ESA's webpage